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Joint Meeting on the Impact of Structural Adjustment in the Public Services (Efficiency, Quality Improvement and Working Conditions), Geneva, 24-30 May 1995 final report.

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Published by International Labour Office in Geneva .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Civil service -- Employees,
  • Municipal services -- Employees

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesFinal report, Joint Meeting on the Impact of Structural Adjustment in the Public Services (Efficiency, Quality Improvement and Working Conditions), Geneva, 24-30 May 1995.
ContributionsInternational Labour Organisation. Sectoral Activities Programme., Joint Meeting on the Impact of Structural Adjustment in the Public Services (Efficiency, Quality Improvement, and Working Conditions) (1995 : Geneva, Switzerland)
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 34 p. ;
Number of Pages34
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18623773M
ISBN 10922109846X
OCLC/WorldCa34052245

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  Structural adjustment Structural adjustments are the policies implemented by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank (the Bretton Woods Institutions) in developing countries. These policy changes are conditions for getting new loans from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) or World Bank, or for obtaining lower interest rates on existing loans. Structural adjustment programs (SAPs) consist of loans provided by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank (WB) to countries that experienced economic crises. The two Bretton Woods Institutions require borrowing countries to implement certain policies in order to obtain new loans (or to lower interest rates on existing ones). The conditionality clauses attached to the loans.   1. Introduction. Thirty years ago, UNICEF published a landmark report documenting how ‘structural adjustment’ programs of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank affected population health (Cornia et al., ).Following the debt crises of the early s, such programs achieved notoriety for requiring low- and middle-income countries to move away from state-led. The structural adjustment policies adopted by the developing countries including Bangladesh have been prompted by considerations of achieving macroeconomic balances and by the need for acceleration of economic growth through greater reliance on markets. Experience of the countries implementing structural reforms during the early phases had not.